Reading too much into news & Wall Street movement can derail our financial plan

Very often we try to check the Wall Street movement and the futures to have an idea of what is likely to happen in the local stock market at the start of the trading day. After all, the Wall Street houses a few largest exchanges in the world. Most of us see this totally out-of-phase time difference as an important leading indicator to position our trades. Big falls are often discussed extensively with a lot of anxiety and anticipation of how low the STI can retreat in response to those falls. Some of us may even be tempted to ‘sell into strength’ at the start of the trading session.

Actually, there were times the STI did not fall in tandem with the Dow Jones or NASDAQ. Just over the last weekend, many were anticipating that the STI would be in for a big fall when the Dow Jones sank 572.46 points from the close of 24,505.22 on their Thursday to 23,932.76 at close on their Friday. But, the STI actually moved up by 7.48 points from the close of 3,442.5 on Friday, 6 April 2018 to 3,449.8.98 at close on Monday, 9 April 2018.

Then on Tuesday, 10 April when President Donald Trump brought out the possibility of aerial strike in Syria, the Dow Jones sank 218.55 points, but the following day, STI advanced 13.38 points. Despite those devastating news, the STI actually advanced close to 100 points (or close to 3%) for the week. For the same period, the Dow Jones also advanced 427.38 points from 23,932.76 to 24,360.14 and the NASDAQ advanced 191.54 points from 6,915.1099 to 7,106.6499. Perhaps, there may be some kind of co-relationship between Wall Street and STI over time, but it does not mean that the STI move in exact lock-step with the Wall Street movement.

Perhaps, those who try to time the sell are not really selling off their stocks for good. It is likely that they wanted to take advantage of the steep fall in the Wall Street to sell and hope to buy them all back when the share prices tank significantly. This could be a wise thing to do if the Wall Street and the STI have perfect correlation on day-to-day basis, but we often find ourselves caught in the situation if our timing is incorrect.

Let us look at transaction cost to assess if the risk is worth taking. Take OCBC for example. Assuming if we were to sell off 1000 shares at the opening bell at $12.77 on Monday, 9 April, and let’s say we were lucky enough to buy back the same stock at the lowest share price of the day at $12.93 on Friday, 13 April, it would still be a loss of about $248 dollars. Even using a priority banking nominee account on Standard Chartered trading platform which is supposedly the lowest brokerage, it still set us back by $220.50. Apart from the trading loss, there is also an end-of-FY dividend distribution of $190 that sellers are likely to miss out given that the ex-dividend date is around the corner. Without considering the loss of dividend, we have to wait till the stock price drop to $12.65 and $12.71 respectively (or a drop of 12 cents and 9 cents respectively) to buy back in order to just break even. With the dividend loss thrown in, the purchase price would have to go lower by a further 19 cents before we can break even. Given that that ex-dividend is drawing near, it is unlikely that the share price retreats significantly for us to cover the transaction cost, trading losses and the loss of dividend. So, the dividend is likely be lost just because of the little folly unless something significantly bad happens from now till the ex-dividend date. Perhaps if investors lost their patience, they may even go ahead to buy back the shares at a higher price. So instead of benefiting in stock investments by simply holding them, we may lose out in terms of the brokerage and all the additional costs in selling and buying them back. Of course, one may argue that the stock price is likely to drop when it goes ex-dividend, but it is still possible that the drop is less than the dividend amount or even creeps up after the ex-dividend. So why leave our fate to chance?

With so many news from many major economies happening every day, it would certainly ruin our financial plans in the long run if we keep reacting to the stock market movements. Sometimes just simply doing nothing is the best strategy of all.

Afternote – Just hours ago, US together with its allies, France and UK, attacked Syria over the alleged use of chemical weapons. Care to make a guess of the STI movement for this coming Monday?

Disclaimer – The above arguments are the personal opinions of the writer. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell the mentioned securities, the indices or any ETFs or unit trusts related to the mentioned indices. 

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.

The need for mindset change in investing (2)

In any stock seminar, we often hear of the same question over and over again. What are the stocks to buy and what to sell? In fact, it is probably the only question in the mind of investors when they attend stock seminars and investment talks. We all like to hear out what is the next popular stocks in town, and hopefully to make some financial gains out of it.

Of course, we all know that good stocks generally move upwards over time in line with their earnings. But within a very short period time in terms of days, weeks or even months, share prices move in random walk fashion. So, there could be some ‘bad luck’ times when no matter how well we did our due diligence, there could be one or two stocks that fall underwater. Buying stocks is a calculated risk. And often, we cannot wait for all the uncertainties pertaining a particular stock to go away to buy it. By the time, when we are certain that the most of the uncertainties have been removed or considerably reduced, the share price would have already moved up significantly. How fast a stock price moves to reflect the fresh information depends on how efficient the stock market is. Then, there are also times, in the spur of the moment, we bought the wrong stocks or even the right stocks at a wrong price. There are also situations whereby government or the relevant authorities suddenly made changes in their policies or there could be some shocking news that hit a company and we were caught in such situations. Worst of all, we buy on hearsays, market rumours and friends’ recommendations even though they might not necessary come with bad intentions. So, there is a high chance that at any one time when we open up our stocks portfolio, there may be 1 or 2 or even more stocks that are eye-sores in an otherwise, a ‘perfect’ portfolio. Hopefully, these bad stocks form a very small percentage in the portfolio and they are overwhelmed by the bigger gains in other stocks in the portfolio.

At least for the start of our investing journey, the problem often is not because of the one or two bad stocks in the portfolio because, over time, we will get to know which stocks are good and which are bad. The whole problem is that we try to save the bad stocks in hope to make them good. This type of investing philosophy is likely to have been inherited from our young days. Right from the very early stages of our formation years, we have been conditioned by the school system to focus on subjects that we are weak in. For example, when we get 90% for Mathematics and 60% for our English, we are very often asked to focus more on our English, sometimes even at the expense of our Mathematics, in hope to bring up the grade for our English. Very often, we bring such philosophies into our investments. While some stocks advanced, there are also others that fall. As in investing psychology, we tend to be more concerned about those that fell than those that have gained. Consequently, we keep on put new monies, and worse still, sell off the good stocks and buy into those stocks that are declining in hope to make it a ‘perfect’ portfolio with all stocks in the positive territory.  But very often, things get more complicated. The declining stocks got worse and the rising stocks got better. This is where the disaster starts. Imagine we try to sell off some good stocks to average down the stock price of Noble even until today. The stock just simply sinks and sinks. As we have more and more stocks into the portfolio, it also becomes much harder to average down each time. Even blue-chip counters like SPH and Comfort-Delgro are not likely to see turns-arounds anytime soon. So, for those trying to average them may eventually give up after a few years of trying. In short, the whole portfolio ends up with a lot of stocks in negative territory and only a small quantity of good stocks on the positive side. As such, the whole stock portfolio underperformed badly.

In essence, sometimes, we have to accept some imperfection in our stock portfolio. Many investors who have been in the market for some time would probably agree with me that if we simply focus on those stocks that have gained and let go of those stocks that have incurred losses, they could have been very much better off than trying to average down the under-performing stocks. There is imperfection, but this is really the play-to-win strategy when dealing with stocks. It is just like playing a game of chess. We never hear of anyone, even world class players, winning a game of chess without losing a single chess piece. In fact, very often, they are willing to trade off high-value pieces to win the game. Even a king with just a pawn may win in the whole chess game. Very often, many investors out there try to save all the counters to bring them into the positive territory by simply averaging down but, eventually, find themselves struggling to outperform. This is because there are too many drags on the portfolio. Then, there are others who do not invest because they cannot accept even some loss counters. On the whole, it is a bigger loss because good stocks do gain in the long run. In summary, it is generally acceptable to have a few minor losses just like not every business endeavour turn into a success story. It is alright to be imperfect. We play-to-win and not to play not-to-lose in stock investing. That should be the mindset.

Note – A video clip on this investing psychology is available free in bpwlc.usefedora.com.  The video clips are part of the more than 60 video clips on the online course in InvestingNote.com, namely: Value Investing – The Essential Guide and Value Investing – The Ultimate Guide.

Disclaimer – The above arguments are the personal opinions of the writer. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell the mentioned securities, the indices or any ETFs or unit trusts related to the mentioned indices. 

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.

Stock investing – The need for mindset change (1)

In the discussion during a webinar that spanned over 2 hours yesterday evening, it was a natural progression that participants touched on the subject related to Straits Times Index (STI) movement. Almost all the participants lamented that the STI has been at its high now and that some stocks are also trading at their historical high. Many were concerned they might be holding the last baton if they buy stocks at this time.

It is a fact. At this level above 3500, the STI is within 10% of its all-time high of 3,822.62 made on 30 September 2007. Yesterday, it closed at 3,512.14 even though it had retreated for the past three days in succession. The general view was that the STI was high, and it was better to wait for it to retreat to a comfortable level before one should invest again. This is the general sentiment of the small sample of participants and I believe many investors out there think like-wise too. This is particularly true in a relatively well-protected Singapore, whereby entrepreneur spirit ranks low and the willingness to take risk is almost non-existent. Many investors get into the stock market with a mindset of maximum return together with low risk, or better still, zero risk. Perhaps, they would only lay their hands to buy stocks when it retreats to below 3,000 level. So, the whole situation becomes a waiting game. In fact, some time ago, there was someone in a social media mentioning that he would only buy when the STI falls to 1,800, when at that time, the STI was probably at around 2,700 level. I am not sure if he is still waiting till today. If he does, then he has missed out one of the best run-ups in STI in the recent years. From a level of 2,700, many good stocks like DBS, Venture and OCBC have advanced at least 35% by now. (In fact, 35% could be an under-statement if we include the dividends that were paid out in all these years.) My point here is that this. Sometimes, our mind gets too microscopic zooming too much on the highs of the index that we have forgotten the fact that behind the rise in the index are component stocks whose earnings have been breaking new highs for several years. The growth in their earnings are not just 1-2%, but at phenomenal growth in double-digits. Even some non-index components stocks also did well over the past few years.

To illustrate my point further, let us look at the Dow Jones Industrial Index (DJII). During Mr Bill Clinton’s presidency term between 1993 and 2001, US enjoyed one the best stock market run. The DJII advanced from less than 3,500 to more than 10,000 by 2001. In percentage terms, the index advanced 200%, so worrying a trend that the FED chair at that time, Mr Alan Greenspan, coined the term “irrational exuberance “, to reflect the extreme market optimism at that time. He was extremely concerned that the market optimism could have run well ahead of the real economy. But then, how is it today? The Dow Jones at this level has been another 15,000 (150%) higher than the 10,000 made in 2001, despite several disruptions like US, DOT-COM burst in 2000, recession in 2001, terrorists attack on the New York World Trade Centre and the global financial crisis in 2008/2009. By the same argument the high of STI at 2,500 some 20 years ago would have been considered extremely low based on today’s STI level. So, in essence, stock market high today does not mean that it cannot set a new high somewhere in future. In fact, if the stock market does not break new high from time to time, then we have a bigger cause to worry. It may mean that the economy has stalled and all our assets, apart from the stocks that we hold, are at risk. Even if we were to divest all our assets and hold them in cash would not help either. The Singapore dollar by then would have depreciated significantly in the foreign exchange market.

So, in essence, we should not let the high of STI intimidate us to think that it should fall in the near future. It is possible, but it is not necessary. Certainly, when the index approaches its all-time high, there will be some resistance as some investors would definitely held back their purchases. But over time, so long as the economy is chugging along and companies are reporting profits, it is possible that new highs be attained. After all, since the global financial crisis, wall street has made new highs at least 40 times, shared between Obama and Trump presidency terms.

Disclaimer – The above arguments are the personal opinions of the writer. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell the mentioned securities, the indices or any ETFs or unit trusts related to the mentioned indices. 

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.

DBS – The pleasant surprise

Abstract – Two years ago, the sudden devaluation of the Chinese yuan RMB caused DBS share price to fall below its book value. Since then, DBS Holdings share price has been on the rise. In a similar fashion, the share price of OCBC and UOB also fell to below their respective book value. For the past two years, the share prices of all the three banks were rising at unprecedented pace. As of 23 Feb 2018, the share prices of DBS, OCBC and UOB were respectively at $29.59, $13.37 and $28.05 respectively.

It came as a big surprise to many that DBS announced a very generous dividend distribution policy following their internal assessment that they have been more than fulfilled the Basel reform requirements. Historically DBS has never been this generous and their dividend distribution to share price ratio has almost always been lagging behind OCBC. Even during times when they offer scrip dividends, their discount has always been lower than that of OCBC. As their share price advanced, the number of scrip dividends that can be converted from the dividends gets smaller, and it became extremely daunting for people who has been targeting to get, for instance, 500 shares for every year of dividend declared. In simple arithmetic, by the time the share price hit about $20, we need to have at least 15,152 DBS shares before one can get 500 shares of scrip dividends assuming that no discount was given for taking scrip dividends. As the share price goes upwards, it is almost an impossible task as the horses are running well ahead of the chariot.

But that all changed overnight as DBS suddenly moved up the dividend generously from the expected final dividend of 33 cents for FY 2017 dividend to 60 cents and topped it up with a special dividend of 50 cents. In addition, it further announced that the dividend going forward to be marked up to $1.20. This means that we should generally expect the dividend pay out to be $1.20 per share for 2018 and, perhaps, even for the next few years. The whole dividend equation changed overnight. What that has been a more and more distant dream of getting 500 shares for each yearly dividend distribution became an instant possibility overnight. For example, in the above case, we do not need 15152 shares for have 500 shares of declared dividend. Instead, we need to have only 8333 DBS shares to get an equivalent of 500 DBS shares in declared dividend. Fortunately, or perhaps unfortunately, depending on whether one owns the shares or still wanting to buy the shares, the share price never look back. It has been gradually rising two weeks ago from $25.36 on 7 February, the closing price on the day before the results announcement, to $29.59 as of yesterday. This represents a rise of more than $4 or about 16.7% rise within a matter of two weeks, literally unperturbed by the Chinese new year holidays in between. With the newly declared dividend for at least in the near future, it actually helps provide a ‘floor’ share price for the stock.  (For those who wish to have a better idea of the valuation may wish to refer to my on-line course on the investingnote.com platform – Value Investing – The Essential Guide) For example, the share price of $24 would now have been considered a steal when it was said to be ‘extremely expensive’ even at $20/- just twelve months ago.

Apart from the positive effect on its share price, the newly declared dividend distribution by DBS has other pulling effects too. It turned on the pressure for the other two banks to up their dividends going forward as well. In fact, in the latest results announcement for FY2017, both OCBC and UOB have already declared a higher dividend whether in the form of the final or special dividends. As we all know, bank performances tend to move in tandem with each other. So, with the more generous declaration for DBS, it is also likely that the heat for OCBC and UOB be turned on to bring up their dividends as well. Even if that do not happen in the near future, the current perception of a higher dividend declaration would help push up their share prices. Adding to this tail-wind is the expectation of higher net interest margin in the coming months. That means the shareholders of the all the banks would ‘huat’ (prosperous) in the light of this pleasant announcement.

Disclaimer – The above arguments are the personal opinion of the writer. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell the mentioned securities.  

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.

The shock that finally comes

Investors had a rude shock on Tuesday morning when they found out that Dow Jones fell a whopping 1075.21 points the night before.  That followed by an after-shock tremor of another 1032.89 on Thursday, 8 Feb 2018. In total, the Dow Jones fell 1330.06 points for the week. This was the second week of fall since the peak at close of 26616.71 made on the 26 January 2018. To date, Dow Jones fell about 10% from its peak. As the saying goes when the Dow Jones sneezes, we catch a chill. For the week that passed, the STI fell about 6.5% to end at 3377.24. Although the STI volatility is much smaller, it is good enough to drive people crazy rushing in and out of the exit door. By now, we know that the recent peak of 3,600 has already passed us and we may not reach it back again so soon. As shown in reality, we do not know when the peak really is until it passed us in real time.

Out of my normal self, I was forced to react making buy and sell decisions in double quick-time to avoid being swept down by the avalanche and failing to pick up good stocks at discounts. This was happening as I was in the midst of scaling down some property stocks holdings after all the euphoria about en-bloc sales in the past few months. This will help get rid of some lousy stocks and enhance my liquidity in preparation for the next interest rate cycle. During times of distress, all stocks, whether good or bad, are all in a mixed bag, moving up and down with the market swings. Actually, such times are the real tests that separate excellent fund managers from the good ones, and the good ones from the lousy ones. As we all know, in an upmarket, everyone is an expert, but we only know who is really swimming naked when the tide recedes.

Extreme volatilities are also trying times when no classroom analyses are able to capture. It is just the human nature of greed and fear that swing stock prices up and down in real time. Even though I am a great believer of stocks’ underlying fundamentals, there are really more to just doing analyses to find out stock PE, BV or intrinsic value. To me, knowing some classroom fundamental analyses probably help us in the first 50% of winning the battle, we really need to understand how the market works as well as some understanding human & market behaviour. (That was why I decided to launch two courses instead of only one in the investing.com platform – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. The former being more a classroom analyses and the latter one being practical aspects of investing.   To me, these two parts have to come hand-in-hand to be more complete as a successful investor.) But again that does not mean that fundamentals or any analyses are of no value and can be thrown out of the window. On the contrary, I think understanding FA is extremely important. It helps capture the first 50% of the battle. It is usually during these trying times that we get to experience their importance. Stocks with good fundamentals usually fall together with the rest of the stocks during a market collapse but will get to be picked up first when we sense that the market is returning to calmness. And once the market is in the state of steadiness, these stocks leap further up ahead of the others. To me, value investing is still the most important subject to take away the stress off the crazy market place.

Happy investing!

 

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.

Being rational in the crowd of madness

Today, the STI ended up at 3567.14 or about 240 points (or about 6-7%) short of the all-time high made by the STI in 2007. By now, it appeared more and more people are thinking that a crash is around the corner. Isn’t this the same old story that started as early as 2011 in the midst of the Euro crisis when it was widely expected that Greece would likely be the 1st country in the Eurozone to default? That was already about 5-6 years ago. Every year pockets of people would shout of an imminent crash. More recently, when the STI passed 3600, it appeared that many more are clamouring that a crash is around the corner. But then, what happened to the real stock market in all these years? Dow Jones Industrial Index (DJII) broke its all-time at least 40 times since the global financial crisis. The NASDAQ punched through the 7,000 mark. Hang Sheng pierced through its all-time high several times, Nikkei 225 perhaps at 20-year high. And our STI, though miserable, still managed to climb pass 3600, second only to the peak made in year 2007. Naturally, when the market is on an uptrend, it must peak sometime in the future, but it may not necessarily end up in a deadly crash immediately thereafter. It can a be long-drawn side-way movement or, perhaps, a gradual decline. The question is when would be the peak and how it is going to happen beyond that? It may happen in 6 months’ time or 2 years down the road and the side-way movement can last for another 2-3 years. After that it can continue to climb or maybe decline. There are just infinitesimal ways that it can happen. So, why anticipate a crash when it may or may not happen somewhere in the near future? In fact, by haunting ourselves that a crash is near, we may risk ourselves into holding too much cash making us look stupid when the market is in a bull run. It may be alright to hold cash for one, two or even three years, but beyond that would be a big drag on our overall portfolio performance. Investing is like doing a business. We do not get into a business when the time is good and then get out of it when it is bad. If there is really a crash, we just have to face it, and steer through it and learn from it. We always read on the news that billionaires whose wealth got decimated 30%-40% during a market crash. But that was only a point in the time-line. With their steady hands, their business actually improved to a next level when the crisis was over. Only businesses that did not sit on strong fundamentals and poorly managed would end up collapsing like a pack of cards during a crisis.

Suppose we have $100k and we engage a fund manager to help us invest. After a few months, when we found out that the fund manager had put 50% in stocks and another 50% in cash. When asked, the fund manager replied that he stayed 50% cash was because he anticipated a crash somewhere in the near future. What is likely our next course of action? We probably pull out the fund, isn’t it? Why would we want to engage the service of a fund manager when he is only 50% engaged?   Isn’t it the same question that we need to ask ourselves if we are managing our own funds when we are only 50% engaged. Think about it. Even if our stocks were to advance 30% for that year, the other 50% that stayed as cash would yield at most 1% return from bank interest.  That puts us a weighted average of 15.5%, which was below the STI ‘s advance of 18% last year, which was considered as a very good year.

So much has said about holding too much cash. As a matter of fact, I also do not advocate holding only 6 months average monthly expenses as an emergency fund either. Without some cash at our disposal, it would be difficult for us to make opportunistic purchases that may pop up from time to time. So, end of the day, it boils down to a few basic questions of personal finance. What is our risk tolerance level and our comfortable percentage in holding stocks?

Historically, with dividends thrown in, stocks are a good hedge against inflation.  Personally, I would estimate the historical inflation rate to compound around 2% annually, apart from some seismic shocks that happened once in a while. That should be matched by about 2% in dividend growth rate in blue chip stocks, even though it may not necessarily advance in lock-steps with the inflation rate. So, it means that if we purchase a stock and never ever sell it off, we should, in essence, not be worse off.  Of course, this is not the motivation for buying stocks. With a bit of stock price volatility but, generally, with an upward trend in the long run, it is highly probable that we can make some money along the way. In a nutshell, stocks should be considered as an avenue to provide a reasonable rate of return in the long run. Based on this very basic fact, we really do not need to be an A-grader in school to make money from stocks. What is more important are traits like discipline, able to acquire some skills on valuation techniques, perhaps pick up a few basic money management skills and get some understanding of the market mechanism. That’s all it needs to gain from stocks in the long run.

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.

2x bagger versus averaging up

We all know that the stock market has been making substantial gains lately, and it is not difficult to find some stocks, particularly the blue chips, that we have bought some time ago doubled itself in the share price. In other words, it is a 2x bagger. Well, impressive, isn’t it? We made 100% in capital gains. And it has not included dividends that have been distributed along the way.

Let us take a hypothetical case. Say we bought 1000 shares of a stock costing $10 per share. For the purpose of simplicity, we assume that the stock price increase 10% a year arithmetically. In other words, we bought the stock at $10 per share at the 1th year, but we stopped there and let the price run. By 2nd year, the stock price reached $11, then $12 at the 3rd year and so on. This carries on till the 11th year when the stock reached $20, which would have been a 2x bagger. In all the passing years, we received dividends equivalent to say about 3% of the stock value per year. Given that the share price increases arithmetically, the quantum of the dividend should also increase correspondingly. (In real situations, we do not expect that to happen in lock-step increment, but generally when the stock price increases due to the better fundamental of the company, the management generally moves up the dividend as well to align the dividend yield with the increasing stock price.)

So, based on the calculation, by the 11th year, we would have made a capital gain of 100%. If we add in the dividend, the gain would have been a whopping 149.5%, of course without taking into the time value of money.  Very good situation, indeed.

Now we take the situation a little further. Instead of purchasing 1000 shares of the stock and stop there, the investor continued to buy the stock consistently. There are, of course, infinite possibilities of buying and selling the stock and we cannot possibly include all the possible scenarios in this discussion. But given that the stock price continues to move up due to its underlying fundamentals, a likely situation would be that he has to buy the stock at higher and higher prices in the whole time-frame of 11 years.  Let us just take a situation that he bought the stock according to the increasing stock price of 10% increment every year in line with the average price of 10% increment in the stock price per year. At the end of 11 years, his capital gain would be $55,000 out of a total outlay of $165,000 or 33.3%. Sure, it does not sound as impressive in percentage term as the 1st case when he made 100% gain in capital gain. But in absolute sense, his capital gain of $55,000 would have out-beaten the earlier situation with capital gain of $10,000. By including his dividend of $33,000, his total gain would have been $88,000 compared to only a mere $10,000 in the 1st case.

Why am I making a case study of comparing the two scenarios? Very often, we think of making 2x bagger and 3x baggers that we forgot that making consistent investments may help us more in absolute sense in the long run than just in percentage terms. Especially when we have consistent income coming in, it makes good investment sense to invest consistently, and even to the extent of disregarding the stock price, to create the investing discipline. Timing the market to try our luck and make sudden gains make us very happy, but building our wealth through consistent investing is the key to financial success. What is the purpose of buying a stock and make a 3x bagger but the ‘new’ monies that comes in go to the bank to yield paltry interest.

But that said, it is important to note that overall outlay in the 2nd case ($165,000) is much higher than the 1st ($10,000), but it is still better than leaving the balance of $155,000 doing nothing. Worst of all, to put it in ‘investments’ that do not yield returns or even negative returns. It is also important that it requires a lot of discipline to consistently buy stocks at higher and higher prices. Psychologically, it is not easy to do so. Our mind is conditioned to buy things at discounts than to buy them at a premium, let alone buying them at increasing price each time. A lot of people lost money in investments is more because they bought wrong stocks at ‘discounted prices’ than people who bought the right stocks at ‘premium prices’. Investing requires several traits that work hand-in-hand – (1) do our homework to buy the right stocks, (2) discipline to hold the stock and even increasing the quantity, and (3) the mental fortitude to ride through the adversities.

Happy investing!

Note:

The writer is not a fund manager to invite investors to buy into his fund. He is taking a neutral stand to look at how we should manage our investments.

 

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.

Starting 2018 positively

Despite closing the year 2017 with an 18% upside in the Straits Times Index (STI), we saw another 90 points increase in the STI to end at 3489.45 in the first week of 2018. For myself, I am happy to have seen many days of advances last year. In the week that just passed us, like many investors out there, I have enjoyed a 5-digit figures climb a day in the three out of the four trading days. In a market like this, it is probably difficult to lose money. Maybe everybody has become an expert in their own rights. But going forward, it is unlikely that things would be repeating at this rate. Complacency may have already started to build in the minds of investors. The advances in the Dow Jones Industrial Index (DJII) has become such a norm that any retreat is seen as an abnormality. Given that DJII has some bearing on the STI, the advance in STI is also becoming more and more of an expectation.

While I am personally enjoying the ride on this wave, I beg to be now more on guard than I had been last year. From the past experience, market crashes came when we were least expected of them. The global financial crisis struck when many Americans were chasing the American Dream. The Nikkei-225 fell when property prices in Tokyo had to be paid by three generations. The Asian financial crisis hit when property prices were around their highest level in the 90s. The DOT-COM bubble burst when there was extensive euphoric belief that any company registered as a DOT-COM was a pot of gold in the making. The list goes on.

In line with the rapid advancement of the STI, many would have agreed that it is getting more and more difficult to find gems that would potentially bring 30%-40% upside to their stock portfolio. On the whole, Mr Market has been quite generous in rewarding the true blue investors due to the extremely low interest rates after the global financial crisis. Going forward, the low-lying apples are no longer there for cherry-picking. In fact, the climb in the recent months has been quite confined to the banks, perhaps manufacturing and possibly some REIT counters that generally offer higher yield. Many of the STI constituents in transports, properties and conglomerates did not really move the STI very much, further weighed down by their lower weightage compare to the banks.

 

As a matter of opinion, the STI should still remain buoyant due to the spill-over effect of last year and playing catch-up with other financial markets, and very importantly, the economic performance of the local economy. But, whether this year is going to be as good as that of last year remains to be seen, particularly in the second half.

Happy investing!

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.

 

Final post for the year 2017

Yesterday marked the end of the last trading day for the year. On the whole, it has been a great year even though the advancement of STI could not match that of the other markets like Dow Jones, Nikkei 225 or Hang Sheng Index. Still, it has been a decent climb of about 18%.

Looking back, it has been a good year in the backdrop of the stock market performance. It is also a year that 2x baggers or even 3x baggers touch-lines were crossed after having invested and accumulated those stocks for some time. Apart from the need for good stock selection, other essence such as patience and mental fortitude to act against times of adversity are also the necessary ingredients to make them happen. But again, life has not been without woes. Comfort Delgro did not perform as expected as it tussled between the bulls and bears the whole year long. The only saving grace has been that a huge percentage of this stock holding was purchased at an average cost of about $1.50 level many years ago and partially sold around its all-time high 2 years ago, thus providing a good cushion as the stock price fell from about $2.48 to $1.98 this year. Another was Midas Holding, which perhaps, was one of those things that we act out of character from time to time.

Taking a longer term snapshot of my stock investment journey, I would have considered that it has been a great blessing. Despite the close to nothing active income for the past 9 years, the stocks advancement had well-compensated for it. The focus on long-term goal has worked well for me to continue to accumulate stocks slowly. It has also taken a lot of pressure off unlike the younger days. This has enabled me to do and develop things that we do not have opportunities to lay our hands on while working full-time.

Perhaps, the generally low interest environment, coupled with the generally mild inflation, in the new millennium has benefitted stocks. By this time, many of us would have forgotten the hardy times when the fixed deposit (FD) rates of around 5% in the late 90s and around 10% in the early 80s. Going forward, I believe going back to the days of FD at 5% could still be some way off, but still, 2% or even 2.5% could be within striking distance in the next 2-3 years barring unforeseen circumstance.  So, to expect the stock performance for the next 2-3 years to be as good as this year would probably be too far-fetch. It could even be down significantly if the unexpected happens.

Until today, I still lament over the first 10 years of my investing journey. It all started even without knowing that a cheque-like paper attachment on a perforated A4 paper was indeed dividend from this company call Singapore Bus (a predecessor of Comfort Delgro). Unfortunately, it had been trial-and-error methodologies that lasted a good 10 years until the Asian financial crisis struck in the late 90s. The greed in me then was trying to chase every single so-called money-making opportunity that came along, attending countless hours in seminars on Saturday afternoons and weekday evenings. Still, I did not make good money in the early nineties when the stock market was red-hot and end up incurring losses when the Asian financial crisis swept across Asia in the end of 90s. In hindsight, I could have probably done much better if I had sought proper guidance and adopting strategies that suited my personality. By today, I do not attend any of these seminars or even some annual general meetings (AGMs) anymore. I think I could have spent those times to learn and improve other skills and to develop things that I can leave a legacy. That said, that was also the time of awakening that had helped laid the foundation stone that enabled me to rely on this investment mode to this day. After all, we cannot learn how to swim without drinking some pool water or learn how to cycle without falling off from a bike. There are always learning lessons no matter where we are in this journey.

Going forward, maybe it is also time to tone down on stocks and focus on other developments as stock investing may become a weary chore.

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.

Comfort-Delgro and Uber tie-up

Just like any investors out there, when I first heard of the tie-up between Uber and Comfort-Delgro (CDG), my first question was – “Is it really a good deal for CDG?” Valued at $642m, CDG is to pay $295m in cash for 51% of Uber’s stake in Lion City Holdings (LCH). The deal is likely to make CDG swings from a cash-positive company to a cash negative company after taking into account of all of its debts. LCH owns and operates Lion City Rentals (LCR) which has 14,000 vehicles in their stables. Of course, the deal comes with sharing of resources such as centralizing the fleet management to dispatch vehicles as well as sharing the servicing facilities and consumables.  While, it enables CDG cabbies access into Uber’s database and vice versa, I am not exactly sure if the benefits are that direct as against giving more incentives to the taxi drivers, such as cash rebates, reduced taxi rentals and incentives to retain existing drivers in order to buy time for CDG to develop more concrete business ideas to counter the more potent threats from Grab.  There is always a limit in which one can drive on the road irrespective of the demand.  As one of the biggest, if not the biggest, transport company in the world, does it really benefit from the deal by buying into a car rental company?  It is indeed like trying to enlarge the world’s biggest airport when not many airplanes call in it. The solution would have been more direct to bring more drivers to take advantage of the platform through more direct cash incentives. Perhaps the main consideration for CDG is the worry of losing the taxi-rental revenue, but so far its answer to the eroding taxi rental seemed not been able to nip the problem at its bud.  The crux of the issue is not the lack of vehicles, but a lack of drivers. They are unwilling to pay for a higher taxi rental when there is a cheaper alternative to rent either a taxi or a rental car somewhere.

The way it is, the collaboration with the once-upon-a time competitor is only a part solution, perhaps a comparatively lesser one. In fact, putting Grab and Uber side by side, the threat from Grab seemed to be more lethal than from Uber. Grab has good funding supports and is willing to get things done even at the expense of steep losses while Uber has been infested with many more pertinent issues such as operational problems and their ‘mis-steps’ with the various local authorities in many parts of the world. The loss of the taxi rental business in Singapore seemed to be more important to CDG than to Uber. Perhaps, to Uber, it only shaves off 1-2% percent off their financial statements at most and that is why CDG seemed to be getting the shorter end of the stick at least from an observer’s point of view.   Meanwhile, Grab seemed to be able to initiate better solutions such as to collaborate with the taxi companies other than CDG to level-up the playing field.  In fact, the several initiatives offered by Grab appeared to be extremely lethal to CGD. It gave special incentives to CDG cabbies that are willing to crossover to the Grab camp. The impact appeared to be more direct, and that probably accounted for the 14% decrease or a reduction of 2,416 operational taxis from 16,722 to 14,306 to date. With an enlarged set of drivers and with more taxi companies joining its stables, it formed a huge firepower base to cripple the once-upon-a-time untouchable rental taxi structure of CDG. More recently, it took advantage of the more frequent MRT train break-downs to work with SMRT by offering more immediate solutions to irate commuters who were either stuck during those breakdowns as well as to those who were taken by surprises of the temporary earlier closing hours or later opening hours of the MRT stations.

Even with a few technocrats who threw their weights behind the deal, I am still of the opinion that there is really nothing to celebrate about for CDG. Perhaps, these experts drive their own cars.

Disclaimer – The above arguments are the personal opinions of the writer. It is not a recommendation to buy or sell the mentioned security.  

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 28 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is the instructor for two online courses on InvestingNote – Value Investing: The Essential Guide and Value Investing: The Ultimate Guide. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.