Tag Archives: stock index

Making sense out of this market

The interest in the stock market returned with a vengeance over the last 6 trading days. By Friday yesterday, it had ended at 2837, an increase of 234 points from the closing at 2603.40 on 25 February. This represented an increase of 9% on the ST index. Imagine if one were to continue to wait in hope that index tanked further, then he would have missed this rally. It may be the best rally for this year.  Thanks to this changing global sentiment, I managed to pick up some battered blue-chip stocks after the Chinese new year to add to my portfolio. This is in anticipation of additional liquidity that will come April and May when companies distribute out their year-end dividend.

The fact that stock markets all over the world were retreating in the last two months was that people were generally fearful about the world economy – the retreat of commodity prices, the collapse of crude oil prices and that the Chinese economy growth rate slowed to 6.9% was the worst in the last 25 years. Similarly, the European as well as the Japanese economies were only trudging along even with huge stimulation packages. Naturally there is a lot of pessimism over the local economy that led to a huge retreat in the ST index over the last two months in January and February.

As pointed in my book “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks”, markets tend to undershoot the pessimistic outlook (and of course it also tends to overshoot during massive optimism at the other extreme). Consequently, windows of opportunity will present themselves time and again. Take DBS for example. Six months ago, it was trading at around $20 per share, but it fell to $13 per share just recently, a drop of about 35%. In between, there were only two quarterly of reporting. Were the results that bad for the share to tank so much? I am not saying that DBS share cannot drop to $13 if it really did badly. What I am saying is that the market tends to anticipate too much before it really happens. And when things were not as bad or when there were some signs of good news, it would start to leap forward. That was exactly what I mentioned in my earlier post (Market rout: A test of our mental fortitude.) that the market is likely to roar with ferocity because the market had already dropped too much.

 

Let us examine the stock market index. About 20 years ago, if the ST Index were to reach 2500, we can safely say that it had reached its high. But today, if ST index 2600 level, it would be have been considered it as a historical low. There were only two occasions since global finance crisis in 2008/2009 that had hit below 2600, namely the euro-zone crisis in 2011 as well as after the collapse of oil prices recently. Again, it is of course possible that the ST index can go lower than 2600 and even 2500 and below, but it is important to note that stock indices represent the value of a sample of selected companies. As stock indices retreat, values of companies will emerge because market is “under-pricing” the value of companies more and more. Stock prices are driven by sentiments, and very often, the market may become so pessimistic that it starts to price themselves grossly below companies’ intrinsic value thus causing big price differences between stock values and stock prices. Consequently, when the sentiment changes, the bounce back becomes forceful. Now that this force had already pushed up the stock index significantly, perhaps the strength to push up the index further may start to weaken or even collapse going forward.

Invest carefully now.

Brennen has been investing in the stock market for 26 years. He trains occasionally and is a managing partner for BP Wealth Learning Centre. He is also the author of the book – “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks” which is available in both soft and hardcopy.

If this stock market turmoil ends up in a liquidity crunch, do you know what the banks will do?

During the times when there is liquidity crunch, such as now when there is an impending interest rate hike in US or when there is a  stock market rout in the region, what is the most important thing for the banks? Yes, CASH at hand! When there is an extreme liquidity crunch, the banks will tend to play it safe. Whether or not they are going to use it, raising cash is the most important thing to do during such times.

Historically, there were many precedences. During 1998, when there was the Asian Financial Crisis, DBS bought POSB. It was the people’s bank with a huge amount of deposits. The main lending activities of POSB at that time was mainly in secured lending such as housing loans and the deposits at that time was huge.

In the recent global financial crisis in 2008, DBS raised S$4.2 billion through rights issue. Seven hundred and sixty (760) million rights were offered at $5.42c, a hefty discount of 45% from the last day trading price of $9.85. Each right was offered at 1:2 basis, meaning 1 right for every 2 shares owned.

In parallel OCBC went into offering preference shares at $100 per share in August 2008. To sweeten the deal, the dividend was offered at 5.1%, a rate way above bank’s interest rate even until today. OCBC raised $1 billion from that exercise. Following that move, UOB also followed suit with the same offering but at a slightly lower rate of 5.05%. UOB also raised about $1billion from the exercise.

In such times, when people are fearful and cashing out of the stock market, this appeared to be the best time for the banks to raise cash. After all, with bank interest rate at historical low couple with the stock market turmoil, many investors are looking to park their encashed money in safe instruments that offer sufficiently good returns. With the bank’s brand name and offering good dividend payout, it is possible for the banks to raise funds with relative ease.

What do the banks do with those money? Well, during market turmoils is one of the best opportunities for the banks. It is a question of survival of the fittest. Many so-called ‘fantastic companies’ will not be trading at historically fire-sale prices unless during such times. Remember that Astra, was one of the crown-jewel of the Indonesia companies before the 1998 Asian Financial Crisis. It was forced to sell its shares to Cycle and Carriage (C&C) before C&C was taken over by the Jardine group. If the shares of Astra had not been sold to C&C, Astra would not have been in existence or could have been disintegrated into smaller companies. Who knows Danamon Bank in Indonesia may be up for sale once again with better selling conditions. The last time, when the deal fell through was in 2013, when the Indonesian regulators allowed only to a maximum cap of 40%. DBS, on the other hand, was looking into acquiring 67.37% (for a price tag of $542.4m) which will ultimately trigger it to make a take-over offer of the bank.

Shareholders, in particular those who hold blue-chips, should maintain your liquidity now. You may be put in a situation to acquire rights or preference shares at a steep discount. Perhaps if you look at it in a long-term basis, it may not a bad deal. When the good times come back again, maybe you are rewarded with 500 DBS shares or 1000 OCBC shares as dividend in its yearly dividend distribution exercise.

(Brennen Pak has been a stock investor for more than 26 years. He is the Principal Trainer of BP Wealth Learning Centre LLP. He is the author of the book “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks.”) – The ebook version may be purchased via www.investingnote.com.

OCBC – script dividend in the money

Recently, OCBC announced the distribution of scrip dividend in lieu of cash dividend. Its dividend was $0.18 per share and the bank had established a conversion rate of $9.50 per share, a discount to on-going share price. Given the discount to the prevailing share price, the scrip dividend has been ‘in-the-money’. Those shareholders who opted for script dividend would have gained much more than the original dividend if he had held the stocks till today.  With the current share price of about $10.36, the share holders would have gained $0.86 per share for the dividend that they held in scripts. In fact, script dividend can be a powerful compounding tool if the share price increase gradually over the years.

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 (Brennen Pak has been a stock investor for more than 25 years. He is the Principal Trainer of BP Wealth Learning Centre LLP. He is the author of the book “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks.”) – The ebook version may be purchased via www.investingnote.com.

STI – Is it better to be on selling mode now?

The STI reached a high of 3549.85 on 16 April, only second to the all time high of 3899.29 made on 10 Oct 2007. This means that the recent high was about 350 points or 10% below its all-time high. Unfortunately, the STI seemed to be going downhill from 16 April reaching at 3295.13 the end of today’s trading day, a difference of about 255 points from its recent high. This means that between 16 April till today, the STI had dropped quite significantly by about 7.0-7.5%.

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Given the drastic drop, many people seemed to be looking into buying or bottom-fishing as some may call. In investing psychology, we call this anchoring because we tend to anchor or fixate the recent high of 3549.85 as an anchor point as if the STI will hit it anytime soon. However, in reality, is STI going to go up anytime soon? Personally, I am of the opinion that it may not. In fact, it may continue to languish for a while given the uncertainty in the US interest rate hike. Economy-wise, I do not think Singapore did well to enable the local stock market to roar. Currently, we are also facing structural and labour issues that will take time to resolve. Regionally, China is also not doing well economically, and the regional currencies are also getting weaker. Hence, it is unthinkable how the STI can tun-around anytime soon. In fact, may be weakening gradually or hovering around this level at best.

Taking history as a guide, in the worst-case, the STI was at about 2370.3 on 12 May 1996 when the government slammed the brakes by increasing property downpayment from 10% to 20%. It was just shy of the all time high then of 2493.7 made on 7 Feb 1996. After 12 May 1996, the STI started to tank accelerated by the Asian financial crisis. In the following two and the half years or so, the STI tanked all the way to 805.14 on 7 September 1998. In total, the STI sunk 66% within that period.

(Brennen Pak has been a stock investor for more than 25 years. He is the Principal Trainer of BP Wealth Learning Centre LLP. He is the author of the book “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks.”) – The ebook version may be purchased via www.investingnote.com.

OSIM: Will it fall off the cliff?

The 1st quarter results has not been encouraging. The revenue suffered a 13.2% and 15.7% drop in the revenue from Q1 2014 and Q4 2014 respectively. Consequently, the net profit attributable to shareholders tanked to about 55% and 52.9% from the said quarters.

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But then, what is in for the shareholders going forward? The gross and net profit of about 73-74%% and between 10-15% respectively appeared quite consistent. To increase profit mean simply to increase the topline, ie. to increase the sales. The operating cost components are fairly consistent between $90m and $95m.

 Assuming a $25m drop in the revenue in Q2 2015 and stay constant there for the next two quarters going forward earnings per share to about 1.62 cents. That should translate to about 6.61 cents for the year. That gives a PE of about 25 based on current price. But this will likely to trigger another round of fall in the share price to about $1.30 and $1.35 (conservatively) as the growth engine has stalled bringing a PE of about 20.

Assuming that the revenue managed to increase to about $170m, and stay consistently there should put the share price back to about $2 or just below it.

The answer lies with the sales team.

 

 

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(Brennen Pak has been a stock investor for more than 25 years. He is the Principal Trainer of BP Wealth Learning Centre LLP. He is the author of the book “Building Wealth Together Through Stocks.”) – The ebook version may be purchased via www.investingnote.com.